New York Times

“Serena Benedetti was smoothly expressive, particularly in her slow arias”

L’Opera Milano

"...she is a beautiful woman, a fascinating actress, and has a fresh and lyrical voice."

Opera News

"...the evening’s highlight, fulfilling the letter and the spirit of bel canto.”

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“Serena Benedetti was smoothly expressive, particularly in her slow arias” (Zachary Woolfe, NY Times, May 20, 2011, for Mitridate)

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“Benedetti sang with angelic surety” – (Gayle Williams, Sarasota Herald Tribune, March 28, 2010) [For Carmina Burana]

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“Serena Benedetti, a soprano, sang beautifully in the Debussy numbers.” Steve Smith, The New York Times, 2/7/09 (“Instruments and Balky Equipment, Too”)

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"Benedetti’s uplifting, vibrant voice with her stylish expression, was a welcome surprise.”  - Florida Sun-Herald 1/11/05

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"The adjusted arrangement [of Mahler's Symphony No. 4] worked best in a tender, practically Mozartean adagio and in an appropriately childlike finale that featured a fresh-voiced performance by Serena Benedetti, an appealing soprano...Ms. Benedetti [gave a] .warmly lyrical performance of Barber's "Knoxville: Summer of 1915". a lissome, sweetly sung account, sensitively accompanied by Mr. Segal and his players." (Steve Smith, The New York Times, August 24, 2009)

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“Serena Benedetti is that rare bird… [she] put over “Mercy” (Andre Previn) with solid intonation and savvy husbandry of vocal power.  “Stones” is the risqué piece of the quartet and Serena Benedetti sold it with such force and inflection that she received a mid-cycle ovation...Overall this was a very affecting performance.”  “Ms. Benedetti demonstrated superb diction and enviable emotional projection…the voice was rich and creamy, full-bodied and sensual.”  Fred Kirshnit, The New York Sun, 12/10/07 (“A Rare Bird Spreads Her Wings: Serena Benedetti Weill Recital Hall”)

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti…sang beautifully, both in solo passages and as an ensemble…”  - Eugene Register Guard 4/12/03

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti produced lovely, silver-edged tones.”  - Atlanta Journal-Constitution 3/7/03

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti [was] excellent both in single and ensemble roles.”  - Washington Post 7/22/01

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti was an ideal Susanna: she is a beautiful woman, a fascinating actress, and has a fresh and lyrical voice.  Her ‘Deh vieni non tardar’ was extremely sweet and silky, winning the audience’s favor.” – Christine Gransier, Translated from the Italian journal L’Opera Milano, Summer 2006

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“Having a poetic name like Serena Benedetti can't hurt a young artist, and the New York soprano made a charming Susanna… Benedetti's bright-toned and flexible vocalism was consistently engaging, and she is clearly a gifted singer with a future.” – Lawrence A. Johnson, Florida Sun-Sentinel March 4, 2006

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“The strong ensemble cast was headlined by Bojan Knezevic and Serena Benedetti as the cheeky and rebellious servants Figaro and Susanna, who are preparing for their wedding while trying to fend off the affections of Figaro's master, a count, for Susanna. The two were well-matched not only in strength of voice, but in attitude and spunk. Benedetti makes an irresistible Susanna, who manages the count's advances and plot complications with a charming spirit.” – Gayle Williams, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Feb 14, 2006

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“Susanna, portrayed with gleeful, glistening voice by Serena Benedetti.” – June LeBell, The Observer, February 16, 2006

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“Serena Benedetti [Fiordigligi] and Kirsten Chavez harmonized so exquisitely, you could swear they really were sisters.  Benedetti’s introspective interpretation is at its finest in ‘Per pieta,’ in which Fiordiligi prays that her absent lover will forgive her for falling in love with another man”.  - Catherine Reese Newton, Utah Tribune 5/05

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“Benedetti possesses a gorgeous, creamy voice that begs to be heard here in larger roles.”  – Norfolk Port Folio Weekly 3/23/04

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“Much applause goes to…Serena Benedetti (Marzelline)”  - The Washington Post 4/15/04

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti was a lively Marzelline, singing with a light, lyrical sound that suggested both flightiness and sincerity.”  -The Virginian-Pilot 3/14/04

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti is appropriately girlish and stylishly Mozartian as Rocco’s daughter, Marzelline…”Richmond Times-Dispatch 3/27/04

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“Soprano Serena Benedetti played Adina…with sparkling personality and a voice to match.  Singing with a bright timbre that flowed smoothly from the brilliant top of her range to the secure bottom notes, she negotiated florid passages with ease, and she moved with coquettish lightness.”  - The Cleveland Plain Dealer 8/1/03

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“As Adina, Serena Benedetti offered a lovely presence with a voice to match: even, colorful and free of strain.  It was easy to see why Nemorino would pine for her, and the Act II duet, in which Adina finally declares her love for him, was rightly the evening’s highlight, fulfilling the letter and the spirit of bel canto.”  - Opera News Online Edition October 2003

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“Benedetti caressed Adina’s vocal lines with a pure-toned soprano that soared radiantly in the high climaxes.  She sang Adina’s last act aria tenderly and truly.  And her voice shot with ease through all the florid lines.”  - New Jersey Courier-Post 6/3/02